Foreign Accent Reduction

These are the areas that are typically addressed in foreign accent therapy:
 

1. English sounds that the individual does not have in their native language or say in a distorted
    manner.
    a. Do you trill your /r/?
    b. Does your native language not use the /th/ sound?
 
2. Intonation of the phase so it correctly indicates a comment or question and highlights the important
    content.
    a. Is your speech monotone or rapid? American speakers use a slower and more rhythmic style of
    speaking.
 
3. Phrasing to indicate breaks for breathing or emphasis.
    a. Do people ask you to repeat yourself often?
 
4. Pragmatics that affect communication such as non-verbal behaviors (i.e. social distancing, eye
    contact, head nodding, turn-taking).
    a. Do people back away from you when you talk?
    b. Does conversation seem tense and doesn’t flow?
 
5. Understanding of grammar and language. Which may include idioms, slang expressions and
    vocabulary.
    a. Do you find you are confused during meetings and conversations?
    b. Do others correct your word choice and sentences often?
 
The above areas are the main areas targeted in foreign accent therapy. The goal is to make your more understandable to others and to have your English feel more natural to you. If you feel that any of the above areas could be improved give us a call 704.541-1373.

Staying One Step Ahead for Effective Modeling

Staying One Step Ahead for Effective ModelingIf your child has limited speech and language, you want to get closer to what they are able to do and not speak in long, complex sentences. Your speech model should be one that your child can copy and practice. You want to model what their next response might be.

Below are some descriptions of what your child may say and some possible responses that you could say.

Example:

Child: Your child looks at a desired item (i.e. car).
Parent: You look at the desired item and point (i.e. point at the car), then wait.

Example:

Child: Your child looks at the desired item (i.e. car).
Parent: You look at the desired item (car), point (at the car), and then make a sound (vroom, vroom).

Example:

Child: Your child looks at the desired item (car), points (at the car), and/or makes a sound (vroom, vroom, or beep, beep).
Parent: You respond faster to reward and encourage this better response. Your response is more fun and animated. Look, point, label and pick up the item. Manipulate parts of the car and say vroom, beep, beep or vroom car.

Example:

Child: Your child is babbling single syllables (ee).
Parent: Joyfully repeat the single syllable with varied intonation and lots of repetition (ee, ee or eeeeeeeeeeeeeeee).

Example:

Child: Your child is babbling two repeated syllables (i.e. da da or da dee).
Parent: Joyfully repeat the two syllables (da da; da dee), look at your child, add a word approximation (say the word properly, daddy) and wait.

Example:

Child: Your child is making animal sounds, car sounds or other sound effects.
Parent: Make the same sound adding intensity and labeling or description. It is always okay to repeat things more than once. (Zoom, zooooom, zoom. Fast! Zoom! Zooooom! Zoom! Crash!

Example:

Child: Your child is attempting to say single words (i.e. Jui for Juice).
Parent: Repeat joyfully and with varied intonation. Add a sound effect or another true word.
Child says juice.
Parent says juicy juice, or orange juice, or yummy juice or cold juice.

Example:

Child: Your child is saying two words (i.e. Ed guck).
Parent: If you don’t understand what they are saying pretend your child is talking in a different language and tell them what you think they are saying (i.e. red truck).

Best wishes on expand your child’s speech and language. Have fun and play at their level.